Four Rules to Follow for Social Media Success

Today is Martin Luther King’s birthday, or what passes for same in our government’s calendar of national holidays.  I have nothing further profound to say about that.

Today also brings a new lot of messages from Google+ informing me that someone I don’t know has added me to their Circles.   About that, I’m not sure what to say.   Google+ politely advises me that I don’t have to add them to my Circles, but the implication is that I probably should.  Isn’t that what social media is about–being social?  So now I have a Circle called Following and into that I dump all those who I never heard of.

Except–well, except I am sort of picky about that kind of thing.  I don’t do wholesale reciprocal Friending on Facebook or Following on Twitter.  I make judgments–yes, so sue me, in this I’m judgmental–about social media, but my judgments aren’t arbitrary.  I do have rules.

Rule 1:  Are you using a provocatively-posed icon photo?  I don’t follow you because I’m thinking you’re using social media as a dating service/pimp.  Frankly, I have no need of either.

Rule 2:  Are you from a third-world country where (a) women are veiled, and/or (b) dictators rule?  I might follow you if you look like my doing so will give you cred with your fellow revolutionaries.  If you seem just to be trawling for Western babes, then See Rule 1.

Rule 3: Are you selling something?  The best, the greatest, the first, the only–whatever, I’m not buying.  Further, I’m not interested.  Further still, I consider that you and your fellow merchandisers have littered my social media channels.

Rule 4:  Are you promoting some service that only you can offer the world if only the world would pay attention.   You know this is you if  you’ve recently bought an e-course promising to teach you the ten easy steps to Social Media Marketing, and you’re now at Step 6.  See Rule 3.

My rules are aimed at inclusion, believe it or not.  There are many, a host I’d say, of reasons why people use social media, and each of them is valid.  Equally, there are many, a host I’d say, of reasons why people hang around with one crowd rather than another, frequent a specific restaurant, or join a particular club.  It’s a nice idea, this being open to everyone and everything–but really, who has the time?  I don’t, IRL or on-line.  Thus, the rules….

Do you have rules for who you follow and friend on social media sites?  Is there a method to your madness vis a vis Facebook, Twitter, and Google+?  Do tell…..

 

  • Anonymous

    I start with a very basic question: “What do I want out of this social tool?” Then, I know who to follow. Typically, I follow people. If a business follows me, I won’t return the favor unless I know the individual behind the account (something many businesses could do a better thing of sharing) or unless it’s a business I’m interested in. Further, I appreciate that you’ve published your following standards. Cheers.

  • http://www.nannygoatsinpanties.com/ Margaret (nannygoats)

    This makes compete sense to me. Lately, I’ve been getting a lot of non-English speaking (Korean, actually) people following me on Twitter. Why the hell are they following me, or better yet, why would they expect me to follow me if I can’t understand what they’re saying?

  • KingMidget

    For me, it’s rather simple. On FB, I’ll accept a Friend request from anybody I know or who I know through somebody else. It’s kind of like the Kevin Bacon game, although I don’t think I’d go all the way to six degrees. In addition, there are a few people I haven’t actually met in person, but who I know through various writing websites. If I can’t make the connection between the requester and somebody or something in my life, I’ll click on the reject button. I’m yet to be involved in much other social media except for my blog. At the moment, I’ll take anybody reading my blog. :)

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